September 24, 2020
Live well club

Oral Health Affects The Rest Of Your Body

We can get into a routine of flossing, brushing, and rinsing, but sometimes our teeth and gums need a bit more care. When oral discomforts and diseases appear, they can have a real negative impact on the rest of your body.

Heart Disease and Stroke

Tooth loss and periodontal disease are not just uncomfortable and unsightly, there is also a correlation to increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Research is still ongoing, however, studies from the last few decades have theorised it is due to the infection and inflammation, putting more pressure on your body and generally weakening your system.

Infections and Diseases

Your saliva does a good job of protecting your body from harmful bacteria. Unfortunately, there is only so much it can do. Dental plaque can be the home to hundreds of bacteria, all of which infiltrate your system and cause an array of infections and diseases throughout your body.

Respiratory Infections

Infections in your gums can also lead to lung infections and pneumonia.

Over time, the bad bacteria you breathe in can transfer to your lungs, going from a dental issue to a whole-body health issue. Oral infections are a lot easier to treat, so don’t sit back and let it progress.

Diabetes

Not only are individuals medically diagnosed with diabetes more susceptible to developing gum disease, but it can also cause the condition to worsen and progress. This is due to its effect on the body’s capability of balancing blood glucose levels. Do yourself a favour and see a dentist before you have more to worry about.

Chronic Pain

Everyone knows that a broken or infected tooth hurts. The pain can be throbbing and spread to other parts of your mouth and even into your jaw and head. Chronic pain makes your quality of life a lot less enjoyable, leaving you feeling depressed and unable to carry out your desired tasks. Don’t let chronic tooth pain dictate what you can and can’t eat anymore.

Alzheimer’s

Arguably the most severe of the effects your oral health can have on your body is the increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s. While research is still ongoing, scientists who previously believed dental plaque to be a symptom of the disease, are now currently exploring the idea that it is a cause.

Oral health is something to be considerate of regardless of your age. Find a dentist you like and make sure to stick to a routine and get check-ups and cleans. Your body will thank you for it.

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